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20121027
20121104
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English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
to have a really sound science before you make those difficult decisions. you know, i am a scientist. i have been taking care patients for 30 years. and i know that you don't change an operation that you do because some people have said that this new operation is a lot better. all right. you need to have years of unbiased will result before you make a critical decision that affect people's lives. frankly, i have not been convinced us what the real facts are. and i certainly don't know that we should be spending trillions of dollars over science that is argued about. because i have been through this before. i have seen people tout the medical theory, saying how great it was and see people act on that end the disastrous results. and i don't want to do that in the field of global warming. >> moderator: thank you. mr. mcdowell, you have one minute. mcdowell: i just look at the scientific issues. this should be an issue based solely on the science of the issue. right now, our legs have dropped about 20 inches in the last 10 years. i looked across the bigger and it really frightens me. i don'
from his first daof work this last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. frotd ameritrade. >> well, today's big storm on the east coast taking some attention away from the election and it's only eight days away. and both candidates are more focused on hurricane sandy. obviously, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. charles: and also appears to be slowing town mitt romney's momentum. the latest gallup has romney up 4 points, 50-46 down one point from the previous poll and the latest rasmussen poll has romney romney by 3. we'll get the new number from scott rasmussen shortly and the washington poll, romney with a 1 point lead for the third consecutive day and a lot of people are talking about the controversial ad featuring, actress lena dunham. >> and of anybody, we want to do it with a great guy, it should be with a guy with beautiful, who understands women. >> and andrea, what congresswoman marsha blackburn. a young actress voting for the essential october is offensive to me f
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. so i test... a lot. do you test with this? freestyle lite test strips? i don't see... beep! wow! that didn't take much blood. yeah, and the unique zipwik tab targets the blood and pulls it in. so easy. yep. freestyle lite needs just a third the blood of onetouch ultra. really? so testing is one less thing i have to worry about today. great. call or click today and get strips and a meter free. test easy. >>> paul ryan is running for vice president of the united states. why is the man running for president of the united states sending his running mate to places in the united states where the people who are going to decide the election cannot see him? that's ahead. zeebox is the free app that makes tv even better. if your tv were a prom queen, zeebox would be a stretch limo. with this enchanting union, comes a sunroof she can scream from... i'm goin' to prom! [ male announcer ] ...and a driver named bruce that she can re-name james... faster, james
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> just before halloween last year was a giant snowstorm in the northeast. kind of ruined trick or treating and it turned out to be the only real snow we got all year. basically it sucked. this year we're anticipating another big weather event right before halloween and it's actually looking like it might be a big enough weather event it might mess with another big national thing a week after halloween and that's something you might have heard of called election day. halloween is wednesday and election day is the tuesday after that. forecasters at the national weather service have taken to calling what is upon us a frankenstorm. it's a come by niegs combination of a few things. it's a hurricane. but hurricane sandy combines with a winter storm coming out of the west and that combines further with a blast of arctic air. a storm or a storm system or combination of storm systems that's potentially this significant is always of national significance. but the fr
and write a political science book and i would go down and live by angie in florida. it is the case that for better than 30 years, it was not just republican and democrat. i suspect the point of this question is that it is grassley and harkin. is safe and fair to say that they both represent the core beliefs of their two parties. this is what we call a truce wednesday. that is how this state operates. -- this is a true swing state. it is not the case when barack obama wins these electoral votes, this will not turn i will blue. -- i know what will not turn blue. his victory will ensure a retention and expansion of the state senate majority which will bring house seats and it is part of a strategy that actually can put us on a possible path to win all four congressional seats. two years from there will be another battle to hold those gains. this is a very independent- minded state. we are not split east and west. it is really in the four corners. they are absolutely the face of this thing. host: barbara, and dependent caller, the morning. -- independent caller. caller: i did not vote
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. you walk into conventional mattress store, it's really not about you. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. this is your body there. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep numr we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-but only while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 st
chris murphy with a four-point lead on the republican. as you can see, it is a difficult science. we will be following the basic, outside the margin medicare. and in indiana, another question mark. real clear politics does not have an average. the democrat is leading the republican in the latest press be simple, but by only three points, and therefore it remains a question mark. north dakota, we are giving it to the republican. over five and a half lead, close enough to call six on the democrat. and then we go to virginia. a question mark. democrat tim king has a 01-point lead on the republican challenger george allen. in wisconsin another? democrat jimmy baldwin has a half of a percent lead on the republican. so if we give the democrats plus for, plus four, and plus 34 republicans, the fact is it gets kind of interesting. we are now at 5246. excuse me, 49. forty-six. forty-nine, and we have a really kind of interesting battle as hyper partisan as, well, harry reid can be, it looks like he may be a fixture in washington of a fixture in profit washington. so it will be kind of interes
in political science there's something called the median voting theory which has been dogma in that world for a long time. it's losing some of it. yeah, thank god. losing some lock on the academy. basically the idea is the natural tendency of a democracy is that the competition between the two parties will lead each party towards the, quote, median voter, the voter exactly in the middle. that's the voter that will give them the marginal vote that will have them win the election. they chase the median voter. the interesting thing is that if the median voter is someone whose political dictionary doesn't work, what does that produce in the political system? >> well, okay. this is a great conversation and i just taught this in my seminar last week at ucla. we could talk about this for a long time, but one of the things that, you know, what you need in order to get the median voter argument to work is a distribution of voters that is centered on the median obviously. >> right. right. right. >> so if we really think the country is moving away from the middle, that's going to change the behavior
and i built a solar car that we raced across the united states. this is not rocket science, folks. this industry has been around a long time. it just requires political leadership. political leadership that my opponent is not willing to exercise. >> the political leadership came from the president of the united states. we both agree coal must be part of america's energy future. it is low cost, it is much cleaner than it was 30 years ago, and i am and all the above energy kind of gal. the energy costs about 5 cents a kilowatt hour. currently, solar energy is four or five times that much. if coal is the fuel of the past, reasonably priced electric bills are a thing of the past. i'm going to fight for those jobs and i will fight for low- cost energy. >> ok. that concludes the first half of our debate. we will take a 60-90 second non- commercial break and we'll be right back with you. thank you. [applause] >> we will go ahead and get the second part of the debate started. as i mentioned, the situation will be reversed in terms of the questioning. the first part of the second half of t
for it. we should recruits 100,000 map and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our atmosphere, that will ma
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> greta: major fe general bob scales calling the september 11th attack on the libya consulate a premeditated act of war and says the united states h should have taken a more forceful action. major general bob scales joins us. good evening, sir. >> how are you, greta? >> greta: very good. the view is during the course of the event what would have been sort of the espected reasonable things a good military commander would have done. give me both answers. >> i will tell you, there is an old military tenet that says when the events is are uncertain and ambiguous you energy to the sound of the gun. in this case marching is 400 in air miles to benghazi. it bass a two hour flight. but according to jennifer griffin whose reporting has been magnify is sent there was a delta team on the ground. there were ac 130 specter gunships and fighter aircraft on the ground. had they been launched as soon as news of the attack started perhaps they might have been over the target and let me
, virginia, yesterday. joining us is melissa harris perry. professor of political science at tulane university. she's a columnist for the nation and host of the melissa harris perry show here on msnbc. thank you for being here. >> absolutely. >> is there a hermetically sealed bubble around presidential elections or does what happens in these swing states reflect not just the presidential election but what has happened politically in those states since '08? >> i think the story you told about virginia going blue, and a story we didn't tell quite enough on election night in 2008. in part, because like ten minutes later we called the west coast and it was over. >> then the election was over. >> so no one really paused it to take note of it. but that transition is indicative of sort of how much virginia has changed as a place. it's always been a border state. it's always quite different in northern virginia than somewhere else. but the fact is that the fights that we have seen there over the course of the past four years is a shifting back and forth of the republican control and then th
, schools give a break to students who major in math and science and those are most needed for florida's job market and undergrads studying political science, they have fewer job prospects in the state. >> alisyn: lady liberty. >> cool. >> alisyn: the statue's 126 anniversary and the celebration opening up to the public after a year long renovation and 30 million dollar project including remodeling the staircase to make it easier for visitors to climb and to climb, that was tough. and 26,000 more people visit each other. >> you climbed up and only made it up to the commissar i. >> alisyn: i was exhausted. >> clayton: can i get a coffee? and they put an elevator in there for handicapped individual who never before had a chance to go up and see a portion of the statue of liberty. today it could be open until it's closed later today by the federal government because of-- and meanwhile we have been talking over the last month what happened on september 11th of this year in libya. of course, our ambassador, a member of the embassy staff and two former navy seals were killed. jennifer griffin had
.i.h., the national science foundation, so i would take issue with the fact that, you know, the republic of texas is making it all on their own. they're getting substantial benefits from federal research and development dollars. which is fine. i don't have any problem with that at all. but to benefit from the oil industry in such a profound way is a unique situation. we don't have that situation every y -- everywhere. but texas does benefit from nasa, from the national science foundation and the national institutes of health. that's helped spur their economy as well. >> congressman, gary on twitter wants me to ask you, why didn't obama stick his neck out for the nonunion workers who lost their peppings in the auto bailout. can you talk that out? >> that's an urban legend. we are working, nart brown and i are working very hard to help the seven or eight splinter unions that didn't end up doing as well as the u.a.w., the iue crferings wa which had contracts essential to the development of the new general motors. but this is not a union-nonunion issue. there were seven or eight different unions that
subsidies anymore. the national academy of sciences has said that any level of radiation from a nuclear power plant is dangerous to our health. so we need to be moving forward. the costs of nuclear power are socialized, and the health care costs that we have are people that are exposed to radiation. i do support, i support governor cuomo's efforts and to support a transition to renewable clean energy economy, and save economy that does not rely on fossil fuels or nuclear power. >> moderator: dan maffei, would you support what the governor wants to do by closing indian point? maffei: there's no question we have to get to work towards a clean energy a comic book we're doing a lot of that research right here in central new york, our universities or at the clean tech center, at the tech garden. in terms of nuclear power, well, we do need to make sure that nuclear power is safe and make sure that it's environmentally sound. i'm not sure we done that yet, but it wouldn't get rid of it until a gotten rid of coal and oil first. oil that we're dependent on other countries for, that we are behold
are making a big effort to apply science to this redeployment. um, when will you have completed the agreements with the stans, the central asian republics? >> there are some treaty sensitivities there, clearly, but i am confident that by the end of this year or early next year that will be delivered. >> right. um, and do you think norton will be able to cope with the withdrawal? >> yes, i do. there's work going on in prize norton, but it's also about ports of entry as well as airports of entry. so this is a national effort in terms of the site of this. what i do is make sure that the redeployment of equipment will not in any way hinder the military operation that equipment is supposed to support. so there's an equilibrium here about supporting transition right through to 2013 and the end which you've heard us describe and how much equipment we can take out. and that's a fine balance which we address and scrutinize on a regular basis. >> so if norton is not itself going to be i pose one would call it -- i suppose one would call it a pinch point or something, are there any other b
it said redaction is then made. and we often found that this was not a science. someone said this morning, it was a mathematical. it is hard. and you will have people disagree even within the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. we would get very significant reductions. give it to another person, much less significant, and it would argue with each other as to what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply with a broad stroke redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why it would harm the national security which is the standard. by pushing back the information in the public that it turned out to be was not able to be released and give the public and insight on what was happening within the agency. inside having access and permission we have the ability and roll that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government because you know what is happening within the agency. you know where the bodies are buried. you know how th
don't know whether that's because of how computer science is conducted in universities or, you know, i'm not with larry summers. i think it's also showed and not physical. but on the other financial literacy, we didn't address that here because were only looking at earnings and not as income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets and that includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts in stocks and bonds, all financial assets, which is to say every asset in the economy except homes, art and gold or whatever are held by the top 20% of the country. the bottom 80% control 70% of the value of all financial assets. so, that financial literacy in the top 20% and probably does have an effect on income
that they made. and we often found that this is not a science. someone said this morning it isn't mathematical. well, it is an art. you'll have people disagreeing with in the agency about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. it gives one person for example, in the fbi, the report that we would get. very significant reductions. we would give to another person, much less significant reductions in the derby with each other as to what could be released. we felt strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with broad strokes, redact all sorts of information from the report that they needed to justify why would harm the national security. which is the standard, after all. by pushing back, we often got much information out into the public that it turned out was able to be released and gave the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. i believe that being within the agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseen. you know wh
that this is not a science. so and of this work it wasn't mathematical. it is in part. and you'll have people disagreeing come even within the agency, about what can be released and what should be released and what is too sensitive to release. you give it to one person and for sample in the fbi, the report, and we would get a very significant reduction. would give it to another person, much less significant redactions and they would argue with each other as what could be released. we felt very strongly that it was not sufficient to simply, with a broad strokes, redacted all sorts of information from the report, that they need to justify why would harm national security, which is the standard after all. by pushing back we often got much information out in the public that it turned out wasn't able to be released into the public an insight on what was happening within the agency. and maybe that thing with any agency, being inside and having access to information, you have an ability and the role that is almost unique in terms of the institutions that are overseeing the federal government. because you know w
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)